Dry Rub for Barbecue

 

Dry Rub for Barbecue
Dry Rub for Barbecue

 

This one’s pretty simple, but often the rubs and seasonings that you can buy pre-mixed at the grocery store have something I’m not supposed to have, whether it’s citric acid for flavor, or a filler, or an anti-flow agent that happens to be derived from corn, wheat or milk. I can’t tell you how ticked off I was to find that one of my favorite taco seasonings had lactose in it. I’ve given this a try on some boneless pork ribs and I bet it’d be great on chicken, but I can’t find out since I’m allergic to chicken. I really liked the bark (the crispy browned bits) the rub gave to the pork. I mixed just enough as listed in the ingredients below to cover two pieces of pork about six to eight inches long and about  five inches wide, because I live in an apartment and they won’t let me put a grill on my second floor balcony. If you grill a lot, you might want to double or triple the recipe so that you can have it on hand. This is also pretty great on roasts and stuff you broil in the oven since we’re getting pretty close to only indoor cooking time of year. The recipe below makes about a third of a cup or so.

Dry Rub for Barbecue

  • 2 Tablespoon of brown sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon of kosher salt
  • 1/2 Tablespoon of ground cumin
  • 1/2 Tablespoon of paprika
  • 1/2 Tablespoon of garlic powder
  • 1/2 Tablespoon of onion powder
  • 1/2 Tablespoon of chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon of black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon of white pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon of cayenne

Put all ingredients in a bowl and mix well with a fork or a whisk until everything is completely blended.  Wow, that was easy wasn’t it?  Put it in an air-tight container to store.

To use it, simply coat your cut of meat with it and put it on the grill or roast or broil it in the oven.  If you’d like to use it with vegetables, I’d coat the veggies in a safe oil first, and then coat them in the rub.

Dry Rub for Barbecue on Boneless Pork Ribs
Dry Rub for Barbecue on Boneless Pork Ribs

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